Posts Tagged ‘British Champion’

Al Reed British Longboard Masters Champion

Congratulations to Al Reed, becoming the 2011 BLU (British Longboard Union) Masters Champion at Gwithian last weekend.

[Al Reed – 2011 BLU Masters Champion]

The fourth and final event of the 2011 British National Longboard Championships was held this weekend at Gwithian Beach in 3ft surf and offshore conditions. With the Open, U18 and Ladies divisions already decided on points by the third round of the series, the last remaining event attracted a good turnout with the runners up of the other divisions fighting for places in the top ten.

Following on from worries resulting from a marginal weather forecast for the weekend, and the likelihood of severe weather on the Sunday, the event was run in one day in what turned out to be highly contestable , albeit cool sunny and windy conditions.

The Masters entry surpassing the Open entry in this hotly contested division.

With only 700 points between 1st and 5th overall, it was all to play for. The event was won by newcomer Alan Reed (Isle of Wight) with Colin Bright (Wales) coming 2nd and Russ Pierre (Sennen) taking 3rd place. Last years Champion, Keeno Keenan( Devon) took 4th Place. This meant that the series winner was Alan Reed with Colin Bright 2nd, Keeno Keenan 3rd and Eric Davies (Devon) 4th .

Full Press Release here;

2011 British National Longboard Championships Press release


Q&A with Johnny Fryer

I always remember seeing Johnny down the fields at Compton surfing from dawn until dusk, and then in 1994 I think a few people began to notice his amazing talent as he became best cadet in the South Coast Surfing Championships at Niton. Johnny grew up surfing on the Island and last year became the first Isle of Wight surfer to become British Champion. I decided to put the questions out to the local schools and sports clubs to see if the youngsters would be interested in asking British Champion and Isle of Wight born Johnny Fryer any questions.

Davina age 7: What is your favourite surfboard?

Johnny: I have quite alot, and its hard to choose a favourite. I have one that I won the English championships and the British championships with, so thats probably my most precious. But its fun to have lots of different ones for different waves.

Abigail age 8: What is your biggest surfboard?

Johnny: My boards aren’t very big (not like the old school longboards). My biggest one is about 6’6ft long.

Will age 9: What was your very first surfboard?

Johnny: ha ha! it was a pink “pop out” board. with black paint splashes on. made by ‘circle one’ if anyone still has it i would love to get it back. It was so heavy and dangerous for me…I was only 6 years old.

Millie age 9: What is the biggest wave you have ever surfed?

Johnny: I’m not exactly sure, probably about 20ft. But surfers messure waves differently by about about half…so we would call it 10ft.

Alyssa age 7: How far away from land is the furthest break you have ever surfed?

Johnny: Some places in Indonesia you go out on a boat to the reef which can be about 1 mile out.

Saskia age 8: Do you have favourite food or any special diet when you are competing?

Johnny: Do you have favourite food or any special diet when you are competing? No special diet, but i just try to eat good, clean food, and lots of it so I’ve got a lot of energy. I love ice cream and chocolate as well though!

Becky (Gymnastics coach): Who initially taught you to surf?

Johnny: I never had lessons, I just always remember enjoying surfing even when I was about 3 years old. I wish I had lessons, it would’ve saved me making a lot of time mistakes in the early years.

Holly age 7: How fast can you go on your surfboard?

Johnny: I dont know. It depends how fast the waves can push you. alot of the time when you surf you try to slow yourself down to stay in the right place on the waves, so its not really about going as fast as possible. But maybe about 30 miles per hour in really big waves.

Emily age 5: What is your favourite manoeuvre?

Johnny: I love getting barrelled, where the waves breaks over you and you stand inside the tube. Its the best feeling in the world.

Bailey age 8: What is you favourite break on the Island and Worldwide and what is your favourite country and why?

Johnny: What is you favourite break on the Island and Worldwide and what is your favourite country and why? My favourite break on the Island is the far end of Compton towards Freshwater. This is where I spent most of my time learning. In the world my favourite waves are in scotland and the Islands north of Scotland, but it’s a bit cold sometimes!

Callum age 11: Who or what inspires you?

Johnny: Family and friends, and people who pursue their goals and get the most out of life.

Ed age 15: Where was the first place you ever surfed and how old were you?

Johnny: I think it was at Compton Bay. I used to surf on polystyrene surfboards when I was about 3 years old, but my first real board was when I was 6


A Brief Banter with Johnny Fryer

Are you the first Champion from the Isle of Wight?
Yeah…I’m really proud of that. In the final the waves were so similar to what I grew up surfing in. I’m going to try and get back to the Island more this Autumn, and surf more. I really miss surfing all those spots. I’ve surfed a hell of a lot of 1/2 ft slop to win this title.


Come Surfing – by Robert Ward

The sport of Hawaiian kings originated using huge Redwood boards is now practiced on a lighter more manoeuverable piece of equipment , made of plastic and fibreglass, and the challenge is as great as ever. The greatest surf is found where the final issue of the storm at see expends its might; the steep sloping beaches of the world. The beautiful North Shore of Oahu, the middle Hawaiian Island. The rocky Pacific coast of Peru; Australia’s Queensland coast-noted for cyclonic surf; the misty California coast. The Basque coast of France where the gulf of Gascogne leads the continental shelfto within a few miles of the land capturing swells from the North Atlantic depressions. Here are the Eigers of the surfer. Here men can still play a dicey game of catch with nature itself, ptting coolness of mind and fitness of body against the inscrutable wrathchild of storm and sea; the wave.
The most sought after wave is the long lining glass green swell held steep and smoothed by an offshore wind. It peels fluently along its length as it is tipped by an underwater point, a reef or sandbar. Good spots where the sea bottom disciplines the swell correctly are not common and are well known throughout the surfing world. Their names are often poetic. The aboriginal beach names of Australia: Avalon, Cronulla, Narabee and Dee Why point. Hawaii’s Waimea, Banzai Pipeline and Sunset Beach. California’s urbanely tagged beaches – Los Angles 42nd Street, Pacific Pallisades, Huntingdon Pier and further South the Spanish names of Malibu and Rincon del Mar (Little Corner by the Sea). This wave, produced by storms thousands of miles distant, smooth, regular and powerful is a far cry from the local wind swells for which a surfer has no love. Especially if the wind is still blowing on-shore the wave is rough, flat and slow. Meaning to the surfer no speed, no place to go – the wave breaks everywhere.
Let us go to the home and paradise of surfing; Hawaii in the winter. In the North Pacific storms are churning angrily, like big hands dipped in the sea they send out gigantic trains of swells. The swells march south and waiting for them is the coral-volcanic bed of Sunset beach. From the south the Trade Winds blow over Monaloas blunt peak. Milleniums ago a fault formed a deep channel at Sunset which runs directly seaward. To the right of the channel the swells are refracted and concentrated on the under water point. They are peaking four hundred yards out. They tremble, hiss as the offshore wind tears spray back off their tops and finally collapse, hurling their burdens forward. The waves are tubing as they break, trapping a tunnel of air which compresses and blasts a cloud of water vapour out of the tube. From the shore one hears a continuous roar punctuated by canon shots from the outside reef. The surfer is standing on the beach, his 11 foot board under his right arm. He is scared – this is big even for Sunset.
He waits for a lull – throws his board in and paddles hard. If he is caught in the hard breaking shorebreak, board and body can be damaged. A rip current is running from the right to the left, hitting the channel and runninf out to sea at four or five miles and hour. He paddles into it. Waves seldom break in the rip.
He strokes out until the waves are breaking inside him. He paddles further yet. He is familiar with the bluebird or loomer twice normal size that sneaks in and plucks him from his board. The resulting ‘wipeout’ may throw him twenty or thirty feet under water leaving him starved of air as the rest of the ‘set’ of maybe five waves repeats the process, then there is the swim in.
Now he examines the ‘line-ip’ carefully. Watching the waves as they peak up, feather and crash down. He must position himself in the Lion’s mouth if he is to take a wave. Now is the time when he must really desire to ride a wave. If not he will certainly call discretion the better part of valour and paddle in. The noise is tremendous, the wvaes obscure the horizon, as they march in. The people on the shore are no bigger than sand crabs. As he gingerly paddles into the line up from the channel, he rises and falls as a set goes through and explodes inside. Outside the sea darkens in four green lines and the horizon shudders as if shaken by an unseen hand; it is the top of the biggest wave of the set. The first wave rears , its face wind hollowed and sheer, to fifteen feet. It threatens to crash down on him. Judging that the wind will hold it he paddles across to the point through which the peak of the crescent swept through. The wave holds and collapses ten yards inside, drenching him with spray. Number two is his wave – it lines up like number one but it is bigger. Some fourteen seconds behind number one giving him just enough time to paddle out ten yards to meet it. He swings round to face the shore. Prone on his board he paddles for all he is worth. Now the critical seconds – the surfers moment of truth. A glance over his shoulder tells him that he is well lined up, he feels the swell lift him, strokes down the face. Suddenly he starts to drop – almost free fall. He has swung to his feet. He hits the bottom of the wave and leans right hard; the board sweeps into a turn and the wave drops where he was a second ago. The wave is peeling fast and below him. The wave threatens to break ahead, the surfer walks two paces down the board and crouches into a ball – he accelerates through. He walks back and kicks off the now flat shoulder of the wave. He screams with exhilaration. The initial thrill of surfing won’t have worn off yet, he’s only been at it for five years.
This is Surfing. Skiing a fluid mountain carved for you only once by nature. An avalanche on a moving mountain of green glass. A unique experience – no two waves are the same.
Mark you it is not always like that. Sometimes conditions are bad. Sometimes the waves are small as to be puny. This is when surfing becomes more light hearted fun. No crushing wipeout to fear. No half mile swim. Now the surfer concentrates on hard turns, a radical style of surfing. Walking on the board, noseriding – controlling the board from the front tip; touchy and fun. So surfing has chameleon moods and surfers talk the common language.
It is hard to capture on paper the ethereal excitement and poetry of surfing. But if you want tangible proof, take a surfer down to the sea on a good day and feel his pulse. Better still, take a board and join the club. You’ll never look back; there is no such thing as an ex-surfer.
The Isle of Wight Surf Club

About a year ago six or seven young people on the Island realized the possibility of surfing locally with Malibu boards. They formed the Isle of Wight Surf Club on April 11th. Roger Backhouse was chairman and his surfing fiancée the club’s secretary. Rodney Sumpter the British champion accepted an invitation to become the club’s honorary president. He has brought much prestige to the club by becoming 5th in the World Championships at San Diego in California. The founder members were John Ainsworth, Colin Burgess, Geoff (Ned) Gardner and Rusty Long. Now only 8 months from its conception the club numbers at a cool 74.
Every Friday the club meets at Clare Cottage, Springhill in Ventnor, but now they face the task of finding new premises as the cottage is required by its owners. Any suggestions? The meeting is invariably held in audible enthusiasm whilst Roger clinging precariously to the chair reads the weeks correspondence and outlines the coming weeks business. From time to time there are films. The last met a full house of eighty (in one small drawing room!) The rest of the meeting is not “organised” and generally one can find members chatting about the past weeks surf, the possibilities of the weekend to come, wrangling over the finer points of board design or recalling ‘hairy’ wipeouts. When it comes to shop talk surfers leave golfers and sailing types cold.
Many of the club are planning trips abroad to surf and viable targets include France and Ireland. The U.S. is on the list too and some members have had good fortune to surf in South America and South Africa.


King of the waves

A DAZZLING display by surfer Johnny Fryer won him the open title at the Quiksilver British National Surfing Championships in Newquay.
Johnny, 26, who lives in Newquay, but grew up in Shorwell, surfed consistently at the Fistral Beach event in the small but contestable surf.
He beat around 60 other surfers to take the title and it builds on his victory in the English Championships last year.
To win the British title the former Carisbrooke High School pupil demonstrated good knowledge and a competitive spirit.
He was presented with a Gibson Les Paul Studio guitar as the champion’s trophy.
Johnny said: “It was a fantastic feeling to win the British Championships because it was something I dreamed about as a kid.”
“Winning the English Champs last year was brilliant, but this tops that.”
He now has sights on winning the Euro Championships and the UK Pro Tour.
Johnny, who has travelled back to the Island to celebrate his win with his family at Shorwell, has been surfing since he was six years old.
He surfed mostly at Compton, but had no lessons and none of his family were surfers.
He now travels the world to take part in surfing events.
Talking about the Newquay event, Joanne Hillman, of the British Surfing Association, said all the competitors had helped to put on a great show.
“Every year the event just seems to be getting bigger and better,” she said.


2010 QUIKSILVER BRITISH NATIONAL SURFING CHAMPIONSHIPS

Johnny surfed consistently throughout the event in the small but very contestable surf. He showed his true competitive spirit and knowledge to be crowned British champion, and took home a Gibson Les Paul Studio guitar as the champion’s trophy. Jayce Robinson & Oli Adams both surfed well in the final but it was Johnny’s day.


Johnny Fryer crowned British Champion

Johnny Fryer was crowned the 2010 Quiksilver British National Surfing Champion on August Bank Holiday weekend. The 2010 Quiksilver British National Surfing Championships in Association with with Roxy, Tiger 24, Gibson Guitar, DC, Monster Energy & Fistral Blue saw Twenty-five year old goofy-footer Johnny Fryer originally from the Isle of Wight surfing at his best at Fistral Beach, Newquay to claim the British title.


Barney Barnes

From the Virgin Islands they traveled onto America, working their way across to the west coast. They stopped in North Carolina to stay with Barney’s sister Rosie who was at university there. Word had got around about Barney and Chris’s travels through Europe and across to the Caribbean and onto the U.S.A. and the university president had questioned Barney’s sister Rosie where they would be staying. When he found out that they were staying at her small flat he made arrangements for them to stay at his mansion. The staff were never to remember Barney and Chris’s name properly and they soon became known as Bonnie and Clyde by the them.